Best free Reference ebooks

A guide to citing and referencing for Business School students (2009)

11 Pages | 85.54 KB |

1 Oxford University Computing Laboratory A guide to citing and referencing for students 2 A guide to citing and referencing for students This guide is divided into two sections. The first explains what citing and referencing are, and tells you when and how to cite and reference. The second section provides explanations and examples of the way references should be formatted/laid out. But first we need to ask… 1.1) Why bother to reference? Whenever you produce academic work you will be asked to provide references for your ideas. You will find this easier to do if you understand why it is seen as so important in British universities. Referencing is essential to: Acknowledge other peoples’ ideas Allow the reader of your work to locate the cited references easily, and so evaluate your interpretation of those ideas Avoid plagiarism (i.e. taking other peoples’ thoughts, ideas or writings and using them as

A Guide to Referencing with examples in the APA and Harvard styles (2007)

46 Pages | 211.74 KB |

Fifth Edition University of Canberra Library and Academic Skills Program 2007 ii Published by: University of Canberra Library and Academic Skills Program University of Canberra ACT 2601 AUSTRALIA First published 1986 Second edition 1988 Second edition, revised 1990 Third edition 1999 Fourth edition 2003 Fifth edition 2007 © University of Canberra Library, 2003 ISBN 1740880722 University of Canberra Cataloguing-in-Publication Data / University of Canberra Library and Academic Skills Program 5th ed. 41 p. ; 21 cm. ISBN 1740880722 Z 1001.U55 2007 1. Bibliographical citations-Handbooks, manuals, etc. I. University of Canberra Library. II Title Also available online at: http://www.canberra.edu.au/library/research- gateway/research_help/referencing-guides iii TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION TO THE FIFTH EDITION ........................................................................................................................................................................................................1 Why should I acknowledge my sources?....................................................................................................................................................................................................................1 When should I acknowledge my sources? .................................................................................................................................................................................................................2 How do I integrate

the harvard apa-style guide to bibliographic referencing (2009)

12 Pages | 65.63 KB |

UNIVERSITY OF PORTSMOUTH SCHOOL OF SOCIAL, HISTORICAL AND LITERARY STUDIES SCHOOL OF LANGUAGES AND AREA STUDIES CONTENTS Page A. PRESENTING A BIBLIOGRAPHY: HARVARD APA-STYLE 3 B. IN-TEXT REFERENCES FOR ESSAYS: HARVARD-APA STYLE 6 Quoting and paraphrasing 6 Quoting long passages 7 Primary and secondary sources 7 Citing from the Internet 8 Citing page numbers in references 8 Referencing and Latin terms 9 Plagiarism and referencing 9 In-text references and bibliographies/reference lists 10 C. HOW POOR OR INADEQUATE REFERENCING WILL 12 IMPACT ON THE MARK YOU RECEIVE Referencing Penalties 12 Original Version: Stephen Cope and Anne Worden, October 2002 Revised Version: Anne Worden, September 2005 Revised Referencing Penalties produced by Dave Russell, August 2005 2 All students in SLAS must use the Harvard APA referencing system. History units within the School of Social, Historical and Literary Studies (SSHLS) use a traditional numeric referencing system

The University of South Wales Guide to OSCOLA Referencing (2015)

16 Pages | 367.52 KB |

Acknowledgements This guide is based on the Oxford Standard for Citation of Legal Authorities (OSCOLA), from the Faculty of Law at Oxford University. http://www.law.ox.ac.uk/published/OSCOLA_4th_edn.pdf licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Sharealike 2.0 UK: England and Wales License. ‘Citing the Law’ is an online tutorial using OSCOLA prepared by Cardiff University’s Information Services staff and available for general use: https://ilrb.cf.ac.uk/citingreferences/oscola/tutorial International materials: this guide contains examples of popular sources of UK and EU law, for examples of other materials please refer to the OSCOLA 2006: Citing International Sources document. https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/sites/files/oxlaw/oscola_2006_citin g_international_law.pdf This guide has also been inspired by guides created by Bournemouth, Cardiff and Liverpool universities. Compiled by Sue House, Information Librarian for Law, Accounting and Finance and Lowri Newman and Donna Waite of the Education Drop-In Centre, with input from colleagues in

apa 6th edition- quick guide to referencing (2012) (2 Versions)

2 Pages | 186.39 KB |

When using these examples to help with your referencing, be very precise with punctuation, case and italics. IN TEXT REFERENCING Include the author surname + the year of the publication. For quotations also include the page or paragraph number. The author’s surname and the year can come first or after the information (see below). Pages numbers always come last. The author can be a group author e.g. Monash University, or, when there is no author, the tile of the source document. Quotation - the author’s exact words in double quotation marks. Reference Citation- paraphrase of the author’s words/ideas Author first Nelson-Jones (2005) stated that “helpers perform different roles from those of counsellors” (p. 7). Nelson-Jones (2005) proposes that counsellors and helpers do not have identical functions in the human services. Information first “Helpers perform different roles from those of counsellors” (Nelson-Jones, 2005, p. 7). In the human services, counsellors and

american psychological association (apa) referencing style guide (2017)

16 Pages | 151.27 KB |

1 Updated 4/05/2017 Overview  Referencing  Academic Honesty and Plagiarism  About the APA style  In-text citation: Referencing sources within the text  Reference list  Electronic items  In-text citations  Referencing secondary sources  Different works of the same author name Books and book chapters  Single author  Two authors  Three to five authors  Six or more authors  No author  Edited book  More than one editor  Chapter, article or section in a book  Chapter or article in an edited book  E-book available via database/publisher Journal articles, newspaper articles and conference papers  Journal article (print version)  Journal article (full-text from electronic database)  Non-English journal article translated into English  Newspaper article (available in print)  Newspaper article (from electronic database)  Article (from the Internet, not available in

Guide to assignment writing and referencing (2009) (2 Versions)

116 Pages | 350.30 KB |

D E A K I N U N I V E R S I T Y (3rd edition) Written by Marie Gaspar, with the assistance of Meron Shepherd, Language and Learning Advisers, Division of Student Life The chapters on referencing were produced by the Language and Learning team for their website. Published by Deakin University First published 2005 Second edition 2007 Third edition 2009 Revised 2009 ISBN 978 1 74156 121 0 © Deakin University 2009 Geelong, Victoria 3217, Australia Contents Writing assignments at university 6 Reading 8 Note taking 11 Summarising, paraphrasing and quoting 13 Check your understanding: activities on summarising, paraphrasing and quoting 18 Language and style 39 Referencing 41 Avoiding plagiarism and collusion 44 The author–date (Harvard) system 48 The APA (American Psychological Association) system 58 The documentary-note (Oxford) system 69 Law style 78 Numbered citation style 87 Vancouver style 97

A guide to referencing styles (2008)

2 Pages | 50.01 KB |

Available online at http://www.monash.edu.au/lls/llonline/quickrefs/ July 2007 © Monash University QuickRef 19 What is a ‘referencing’ style? Referencing styles are established systems of referencing with consistent rules. Referencing style requirements cover the two elements of a referencing system: a. in-text citations such as author-date citations or footnotes b. reference lists or bibliographies. What do I need to know about referencing styles? There is a wide range of referencing styles, each with different origins and features. Some disciplines have developed their own style. For example, the American Psychological Association (APA style) was developed specifically for Psychology. Some disciplines have adopted a particular referencing style, while other disciplines may use a range of referencing styles. It is up to students to familiarise themselves with the referencing style requirements for each subject. Consistency is most important. Do not mix referencing styles within one piece of writing. Which referencing style

APA Style Guide to Electronic References (2009)

6 Pages | 461.93 KB |

Sometimes it can be not only confusing but difficult to reference an electronic source correctly. In 2009, the American Psychological Association (APA) revised and updated a new 6th edition manual by providing examples and changes in referencing electronic type media. Writers should keep in mind that they should add as much electronic retrieval information as needed so that others can locate the source that has been cited. There are a couple of changes that should be noted:  For journal articles, always include the journal issue number (if available) along with the volume number, regardless of whether the journal is paginated separately by issue or continuously by volume (p. 2).  No retrieval date is necessary for information that is not going to be changed or updated in the future, such as a journal article or book (p. 2).  When a DOI (Digital

Lawtel UK Case Law Quick Reference Guide (2016)

8 Pages | 1.09 M |

Lawtel UK Case Law Quick Reference Guide Coverage  Summaries of reported and unreported cases 1980 onwards  Links to full judgment where available  Courts covered: Supreme Court; House of Lords; Privy Council; Court of Appeal (Civil and Criminal Divisions); Family Court; Administrative Division; Queen’s Bench Division; and other courts and tribunals  Lawtel matches the following law reports in coverage and adds references to these in the Case summary: The Law Reports; All England Law reports; Weekly Law Reports; Times Law Reports and many specialist law reports series Methods of Searching There are two main ways to search for cases on Lawtel. 1. From Lawtel’s front page Enter the case name or subject terms in the search box and tick Case Law. If you want to, you can limit your search by date. Use the From and To boxes. Click on Search. A list of hits will appear.